VYT ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Check out the incredible things our members have been up to!

 

VYT 2016 - 2017

Beneficiaries

VYT initiatives directly benefited 4,030 individual youth; VYT initiatives benefited another 25,192 youth indirectly.

Resources

VYT members brought in $951,760 in cash, in-kind, and volunteer resources to enhance programs and initiatives that  support low-income youth and families.

Community Volunteers

VYT members recruited and/or managed 683 volunteers (mentors, tutors, and general volunteers) who gave 26,898 hours of service to initiatives serving low-income youth and families.

Youth development

VYT members supported 305 education programs and initiatives (academic skills, literacy, mentoring, tutoring, service learning, out-of-school time programs) benefitting 2,432 individual youth.

Member Development

20 of the 21 VYT members (95%) who served completed service.

 

  6 members (30%) chose to re-enroll in service; 3 in VYT; 2 in VYT's sister program the Vermont Youth Development Corps; and 1 elsewhere.

 

In exit surveys, 100% planned to stay involved in their communities. 

 

members were hired by their sites. 

Healthy Futures

255 Healthy Futures programs and initiatives (nutrition education, food security, community gardens, healthy meals, and physical activity) were supported by VYT members benefiting 1,503 individual youth

Community &Public Relations

VYT members developed 571 public relations tools to create more awareness of the services, programs, and initiatives, making more than 3,181 posts to social media.

Technology &Operational Systems

VYT members created or enhanced 260 technology and operational systems for community-based organizations (databases, websites, forms, manuals, surveys, etc.)

Effectiveness & Efficiency

100% of the organizations where VYT members completed service reported that the service made their organizations more effective and/or efficient. 

Stories from the members:

January 2017, VYT member at United Counseling Service/Seedlings Program:

I walked in the room behind one of our 2nd grade Seedlings students and caught her trying to eat a Clementine, peel and all. She had already had three clementines, some apples, an entire sleeve of crackers, and yogurt. I told her she didn’t have to eat it with the peel on and was able to peel the rest of it for her. It was really on that day that I started to get concerned about some of the students being out of school so long over break. Many of them are food insecure and are very dependent on school lunch, breakfast, and Seedling snack. This gave me the motivation for our Holiday food drive for the Seedlings students. The volunteers were amazing and everyone chipped in so much. The students all went home with huge boxes of food, most of which were non-perishable and did not require a stove- so our students living in hotels (only have a microwave) were able to make everything and have it over break too.

January 2017, VYT members at The Willowell Foundation:

This quarter I have served to create a partnership with the Monkton Wood Bank and HOPE (Helping Overcome Poverty's Effects).  This innovative resource to the community is very new and I have sought to help it get established over the last few months.  It is a firewood and heating assistance resource for Monkton and surrounding area residents.  My efforts for the wood bank have been in organizational capacities.  I have adapted a volunteer database sheet, managed volunteers, as well as done community outreach on Front Porch Forum.  I have also been the contact for our partner organization HOPE, who finds the recipients. I feel this resource is a very immediate way to alleviate poverty.  Most of Willowell's programming goes to alleviating poverty in the long term through education and college preparation.  The Monkton Wood Bank helps families now, and that is beneficial as you can see the effect in the moment.

 
 

VYT 2015 - 2016

Beneficiaries

VYT initiatives directly benefited 10,722 individual youth and adults; VYT initiatives benefited another 21,432 youth indirectly.

Resources

VYT members brought in $2,030,322 in cash, in-kind, and volunteer resources.

Community Volunteers

VYT members recruited and/or managed 1,032 volunteers (mentors, tutors, and general volunteers) who gave 56,176 hours of service to initiatives serving low-income youth and families.

Outreach

VYT members’ efforts reached 4,785 individuals; VYT members partnered with 1,073 community stakeholders.

Member Development

26 of the 28 VYT members who served completed service; both of the members who ended early did so because of their own or a parent’s health crisis.

 

  Almost 40% of the team (10 members) chose to re-enroll for a second year.

 

In exit surveys, 100% planned to stay involved in their communities. 

 

members were hired by their sites. 

Programs

VYT members developed 242 programs, including nutrition education, physical movement, job skills and internships, affordable housing education, academic skills, mentoring, tutoring, afterschool programs, literacy, and service learning.

Community &Public Relations

VYT members developed 25 public relations and media plans; they disseminated more than 620 PR documents and made more than 4,421 posts to social media.

Technology &Operational Systems

VYT members developed 85 technology and operational system for community-based organizations (databases, electronic calendars, electronic filing, websites, etc.)

Effectiveness & Efficiency

100% of the organizations where VYT members completed service reported that the members’ service made their organizations more effective and efficient.  

Stories from the members:

December 2015, VYT member at Salvation Farms-Vermont Gleaning Collective:

This past quarter, Salvation Farms organized the 3rd Annual Apple Gleaning Series, part of an ongoing partnership with the Yates Family Orchard in Hinesburg. My main role was recruiting and coordinating volunteers, and supported the distribution of the apples to local sites. This year was the most successful season yet!  One hundred and thirty (130) volunteers collected nearly 30,000 pounds of high-quality apples and distributed them to charitable and institutional food sites throughout the state.  It was a rich learning experience that taught me about organizing volunteers, effective ways of coordinating events, as well as the components of the distribution process.

March 2016, VYT members at The Willowell Foundation:

In December I partnered with Willowell’s VYDC member to plan and execute an event called the Local Foods Feast. The goal of this event is to get local food into the school and promote healthy eating and food source education.  This event takes place annually at Vergennes Union School but has been run by different student groups in the past. Willowell, collaborating closely with the Walden Project, facilitated this year’s event. We planned a menu centered on local, seasonal foods, and engaged the community by collecting donations from local businesses (Dakin Farms and Champlain Orchards), as well as harvesting produce from Willowell’s garden.  Collaborating closely with the Vergennes Union School’s kitchen staff we cooked lunch, available to the entire school (staff, middle school and high school students).  As to be expected there were a few hiccups in the actual cooking but the students were engaged in the whole process – cooking, serving and cleaning up. Overall it ended up being a great event, and we received positive feedback from staff and students.  It was a learning opportunity for me regarding farm to school parameters, and inspired me to research and hopefully help develop this more farm to school events.
 

 

VYT 2014 - 2015

 

Beneficiaries

VYT initiatives directly benefited 5,981 individual youth and adults; VYT initiatives benefited another 56,097 youth indirectly.

Resources

VYT members brought in $966,072 in cash, in-kind, and volunteer resources.

Community Volunteers

VYT members recruited and/or managed 2,193 volunteers (mentors, tutors, and general volunteers) who gave 24,621 hours of service to initiatives serving low-income youth and families.

Outreach

VYT members’ efforts reached 1,959 individuals; VYT members partnered with 575 community stakeholders.

Programs

VYT members developed 196 programs, including nutrition education, physical movement, job skills and internships, affordable housing education, academic skills, mentoring, tutoring, afterschool programs, literacy, and service learning.

Community &Public Relations

VYT members developed 472 public relations and media plans and made more than 4,568 posts to social media.

Technology &Operational Systems

VYT members developed 115 technology and operational system for community-based organizations (databases, electronic calendars, electronic filing, websites, etc.)

Effectiveness & Efficiency

24 Organizations (sites) received capacity-building services; 19 reported that member service made them more efficient; 18 reported that member service made them more effective; 17 reported that member service resulted in an increase in request for services.

Stories from the members:

September 2014, VYT member at the DREAM Program:

This week I gave a brief presentation at the College of St. Joseph's in which I presented on DREAM, in an attempt to recruit potential mentors.  At the end of the presentation I stood in the lobby and handed out applications and information sheets.  Students started to form a line to receive an application.  Since the line was a little overwhelming I quickly shook hands and handed out the papers reiterating the importance of the deadline.  This entire time I was aware of a girl who stood rather close by but just watched patiently as applications flew from the stack of papers.  Once the rush of students cleared she walked over and introduced herself.  She stuck her hand out, said her name, and proudly told me that she was a mentee years ago with The DREAM Program.  It is moments like this when I know for certain why I love mentoring and why I DREAM.

 

September 2014, VYT at Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce:

Possibly the most rewarding moment of my service so far was when I was able to secure an internship for a student who wanted to learn about being a dentist.  This student had recently moved to the United States from Iraq, and she wanted to go to college for dentistry or oral hygiene, and desired an internship at the community health center where she went to have her teeth cleaned herself. This community health center had never been willing to take a high school intern before, and the student’s young age made them even more wary. However, I visited the office with the student, and together we talked to the Dental Director, and convinced her to take an intern for the autumn. I could tell that the student was very happy to have this opportunity and so far she has gotten a great deal out of the experience, which will be a great advantage for her in the future.

 

VYT 2013 - 2014

 

Beneficiaries

VYT initiatives directly benefited 6,388 individual youth and adults; VYT initiatives benefited another 58,219 youth indirectly.

Resources

VYT members brought in $1,173,625 in cash, in-kind, and volunteer resources.

Community Volunteers

VYT members recruited and/or managed 2,116 volunteers (mentors, tutors, and general volunteers) who gave 33,341 hours of service to initiatives serving low-income youth and families.

Outreach

VYT members’ efforts reached 4,993 individuals; VYT members partnered with 727 community stakeholders.

Programs

VYT members developed 237 programs, including nutrition education, physical movement, job skills and internships, affordable housing education, academic skills, mentoring, tutoring, afterschool programs, literacy, and service learning.

Community &Public Relations

VYT members developed 622 public relations and media tools and made more than 3,391 posts to social media.

Technology &Operational Systems

VYT members developed and enhanced  188 technology and operational system for community-based organizations (databases, electronic calendars, electronic filing, websites, etc.)

Effectiveness & Efficiency

Of the sites reporting, 100% said that the capacity building efforts of VYT members made their organizations more efficient and efficient. 89% said that the capacity building efforts of the VYT members led to more requests for services

Stories from the members:

December 2013, VYT member at the Youth Development Program:

What has made the most significant impact on me these last couple of months has been witnessing the interactions between the youth I serve and the adults who work in child welfare. Involving youth in initiatives to improve policy or court the court system is not an easy process between conflicting schedules and the unique language barrier between professionals and adolescents, but when it works it is incredible to witness the effect it has on everyone involved, and especially the way it empowers youth. One young woman, a youth in foster care, is now the youth representative to a task force made up of judges, state representatives, commissioners, and other high level professionals. This young woman attended a meeting of the task force and shared her experiences of what it was like to make it through school while in foster care, and the adults were captivated by what she had to say. She left that meeting feeling like they had really listened to her and feeling like what she had to say could truly have an impact on the decisions that they would be making. Now she can’t wait to find other opportunities to speak to groups about her experiences and how she thinks the system could be improved. 

July 2014, VYT member at All-4-One (Springfield): 

Although we started out strong with our school garden dreams, we quickly found that the soil in our proposed garden space is less than ideal; when we went to test for heavy metals we quickly learned that the soil was plagued with rocks and gravel. We requested an in-kind donation from a local soil and rock company but I was keeping my expectations of their donation low, in case things didn't work out. When I spoke to them I was taken aback by their offer to donate two dump trucks of loam for our garden! Moreover, the company was really easy to work with and their owners and employees were very nice and flexible-they even agreed to drop off the loam during our program hours so the students could see the big dump trucks dumping the dirt. It was exciting for everyone to watch them dump the dirt, and I think that it sparked the interest of some of the students who previously were apathetic toward working in the garden. I think it was pretty fun and satisfying for the truck operators to see all the students’ smiles and hear all of their gasps of excitement. For me, the loads of dirt served as a bit of a morale boost- when many in kind donations are low for how much effort they take, that pile of dirt is a large, tangible accomplishment.

 

VYT 2012 - 2013

 

Beneficiaries

VYT initiatives directly benefited 7,966 individual youth and adults; VYT initiatives benefited another 56,781 youth indirectly.

Resources

VYT members brought in $1,509,534 in cash, in-kind, and volunteer resources.

Community Volunteers

VYT members recruited and/or managed 2,029 volunteers (mentors, tutors, and general volunteers) who gave 43,977 hours of service to initiatives serving low-income youth and families.

Outreach

VYT members’ efforts reached 2,848 individuals; VYT members built community partnerships through collaborations with 424 community groups.

Programs

VYT members developed 181 programs, including nutrition education, physical movement, job skills and internships, affordable housing education, academic skills, mentoring, tutoring, afterschool programs, literacy, and service learning.

Community &Public Relations

VYT members developed 547 public relations and media tools and made more than 3,956 posts to social media.

Technology &Operational Systems

VYT members developed and enhanced 230 technology and operational system for community-based organizations (databases, electronic calendars, electronic filing, websites, etc.)

Effectiveness & Efficiency

95% of organizations hosting VYT members reported that the members’ activities made the organization more efficient, 89% reported that they had an increase in request for services, and 100%reported that the members’ activities made the organization more effective. 

Stories from the members:

 

April 2013, VYT member at VT Affordable Housing Coalition:

This week has been one of my most exciting yet.  We finally have an official resident association equipped with bylaws, elected officers, and fully-sufficient monthly meetings and projects.  We held elections on Thursday, and three women that I’ve been supporting for the past two months were unanimously accepted as steering committee members.  Not only was this a success, but the residents created the meeting’s agenda and I only facilitated one section, the election!  I was proud to see their unique and well-rounded facilitation styles and techniques.  I know that they will be a terrific model for associations to come.  I’m excited to continue supporting them, but sad to see my involvement start to wane. However, I know that I’ve done my “job” well if I worked myself out of a role in that association.

May 2013, VYT member at Winooski Community Services Department:

I submitted another grant for the gardens this week. It’s definitely exhilarating to get a grant out the door and also a relief. We are in the thick of grant season right now with quite a few grants due in the next few weeks. Grant writing, while stressful, has been one of my favorite parts of service. It fits my personality and it’s exciting getting funding for programs.

July 2013, VYT member at VT Coalition to End Homelessness:

In April, the Vermont Affordable Housing Coalition was asked to give a presentation on housing and homelessness statewide to a class in the Big Picture South Burlington program. Another VYT A*VISTA member and I agreed to prepare for and give the presentation.  At first, I was nervous about providing accurate and pertinent information to a group of high school students. However, as the presentation went on, I began to realize how much we had learned during the past eight months; we were able to provide a lot of background and engage in an interactive and lively discussion about housing issues in Vermont and across the country. The experience caused me to reflect on how much I was learning in this position, and the real impact of this position on the way I communicate.

July 2013, VYT member at The Junction:

This week I completed an employment packet for you youth that are employed through us to work for Listen Community Services' thrift stores. These packets ask typical job application questions, helps youth evaluate their strengths and weaknesses in a thoughtful way, and lets them identify how they will use the money that they earn.  The entire process also includes a mock interview (for practice) and a one-month follow up form that asks them again to identify their skills and track their progress if they have been saving up for a particular item.  

 

​​Call us:

802-229-9151

​Find us: 

c/o Washington County Youth Service Bureau/Boys & Girls Club

P.O. Box 627/38 Elm Street

Montpelier, VT 05601-0627

The Vermont Youth Development Corps AmeriCorps State Program (VYDC) and the Vermont Youth Tomorrow AmeriCorps VISTA Program (VYT) are programs of the Washington County Youth Service Bureau/Boys & Girls Club and receive funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service.